Japanese Lacquerware

Lacquerware (漆器 shiki) is a Japanese craft with a wide range of fine and decorative arts, as lacquer has been used in urushi-e, prints, and on a wide variety of objects from Buddha statues to bento boxes for food.
A number of terms are used in Japanese to refer to lacquerware. Shikki (漆器) means “lacquer ware” in the most literal sense, while nurimono (塗物) means “coated things”, and urushi-nuri (漆塗) means “lacquer coating.”
The history of lacquerware in Japan reaches back to the Jōmon period.
The sap of the lacquer tree, today bearing the technical description of “urushiol-based lacquer,” has traditionally been used in Japan. As the substance is poisonous to the touch until it dries, the creation of lacquerware has long been practiced only by skilled dedicated artisans.  (source: Wiki)
lacquerware
lacquerware
image source: JNTO
Shunkei
Shunkei
Makie
Makie

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