Shinto shrine

A Shinto shrine (神社 jinja, archaic: shinsha, meaning: “place of the god(s)”) is a structure whose main purpose is to house (“enshrine”) one or more kami. Its most important building is used for the safekeeping of sacred objects, and not for worship. Although only one word (“shrine”) is used in English, in Japanese Shinto shrines may carry any one of many different, non-equivalent names like gongen, -gū, jinja, jingū, mori, myōjin, -sha, taisha, ubusuna or yashiro. (source: Wiki)
Shinto shrine
Shinto shrine
Shinto shrine
The kannushi (神主 kami master) or shinshoku (神職 kami employee) is a priest responsible for the shrine’s maintenance and for officiating ceremonies. These two terms were not always synonyms. Originally a kannushi was a holy man who could work miracles and who, thanks to purificatory rites, could work as an intermediary between kami and man, but later the term evolved to being synonymous with shinshoku, that is, a man who works at a shrine and holds religious ceremonies there. (source: Wiki)
Shinto shrine
Shinto shrine
image source: JNTO
Komainu
komainu
komainu
Torii
Torii
 
 
Torii
Chozuya
Chozuya
Ise Jingu Shrine
Ise jingu shrine
Sumiyoshi Taisha
Sumiyoshi taisha
Kasuga Taisha
Kasuga Taisha
Izumo Taisha
Izumo Taisha
Usa  Jingu
Usa Jingu
Kamo Jinja
Kamo Jinja
Ema
Ema
Omikuji
Omikuji
Suzu
Suzu
 Omamori
 Omamori
Kannushi
Kannushi
Okame
Okame
Hyottoko
Hyottoko
 
 

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